Our Blog

Playing Phonics Games to Build Fluency

  • Feb. 8, 2022, 5 p.m.

Games help our learners develop skill proficiency. A good game will challenge thinking and require the player to strategize. Here are a few of my favorite games for children learning phonics AND for older students who haven't developed their encoding and decoding proficiency.


Big Word Meltdown-The goal of this game is to make as many words as you can using only the letters in the big word. Choose a word that contains 9-15 letters. I like to choose science, social studies, or holiday words. Challenge your students to create small words using only the letters from the big word. The person or team who makes the most words wins.

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Have You Joined the Wordle Craze?

  • by Kelly Harmon
  • Jan. 30, 2022, 7:55 p.m.

Are you playing Wordle? This game was created by Josh Wardle for his crossword-loving partner.  I’m obsessed! It’s the best digit game to come out since this type of entertainment became popular. It demands strategic thinking as you guess the word in six (or fewer) tries. You have to utilize your knowledge of how words work. There’s no way to binge the game, as there is only one posted game per day. It is just enough to help you exercise the gray matter and then move on. Best of all, when you guess the word you have a reason to celebrate. We need more celebration in our life! 


As an educator, I always try to evaluate game based on how they can benefit students. Games are a tool for building fluency. Fluency is defined as automaticity and/or controlled processing. When first learning a skill, our brains must make sense of the skill. When should I use the skill? What are the steps of this skill? The more feedback we get as we learn the skill, the quicker our efforts can improve. This feedback is really just good coaching! 

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Coaching Reluctant Workers

  • by Cindy Jones
  • April 15, 2021, 5:57 p.m.

I have worked with many reluctant workers throughout the years. There are certain neutral phrases that encourage students to work without causing them to react negatively. The concept is based on the model, Life Space Crisis Intervention. I train about this in my workshops, and teachers have frequently told me that this has been incredibly beneficial for them.


What are the steps that you use when coaching reluctant workers?

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Increasing Rigor with Worked Examples

  • by Ashley Taplin
  • April 15, 2021, 11:35 a.m.

By Ashley Taplin and Rachel Mane


According to Robert J. Marzano in Understanding Rigor in the Classroom, “knowledge that has been proceduralized can be turned into worked examples” (Marzano, Understanding Rigor in the Classroom).


A worked example, as explained by Hattie’s research with Visible Learning, is “a problem statement with step-by-step guidelines for finding the solution. Worked examples enable students to focus on discrete problem-solving tasks, rather than attempting to hold each of the steps in their working memory while solving a complex problem.” (Hattie, Metax). Marzano says, “the cognitive analysis process of comparing can enhance the rigor with which students execute procedural knowledge.” (Marzano, Understanding Rigor in the Classroom).


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Catching Up Students Who Have Unfinished Learning

  • by Kelly Harmon
  • April 15, 2021, 11:31 a.m.

I was talking with four 2nd grade teachers last week who are very worried about how they are going to send their students to 3rd grade reading and writing "on level." Given that during first grade, the students went into lockdown for the entire fourth quarter of the year and then with the challenges of keeping kids safe this year, these teachers were feeling very defeated. They wanted to know what I thought is possible for their students with the forty days left in the year.


First, we accept what we can't control and then, with laser-like intention, we focus on strategies that have the best chance for impacting student literacy growth.


Here are 4 strategies for helping students accelerate literacy growth during the last weeks of school.

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Creating and Maintaining a Successful Educator/Parent Team

  • by Cindy Jones
  • Feb. 7, 2021, 4:46 p.m.

Sometimes when working with the parents of your students, things can get tense. I would like to offer some tips that have helped me throughout my years in education as a general and special education teacher, consultant, and administrator.

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Two Easy-to-Use Strategies for Engaging Students and Increasing Rigor

  • by Rachel Mane
  • Feb. 7, 2021, 4:44 p.m.

With virtual and hybrid learning, it can be challenging to keep student engagement alive and formatively assess student learning in the moment. Here are two strategies I use to not only increase student engagement, but quickly monitor student learning and identify any misconceptions. These strategies can be used in all content areas as well as all grade levels.




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Using Jamboard to Engage Students

  • by Ashley Taplin
  • Feb. 7, 2021, 4:39 p.m.

I recently worked with a teacher on revamping a lesson to increase student engagement. Before designing the lesson, I asked her to describe what student engagement looks like and sounds like in her own classroom. Doing this seemed simple, but it uncovered key values that were important to her and helped bring more clarity to her vision.




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Using Data to Determine What Students Need to Learn and Practice for Writing

  • by Kelly Harmon
  • Feb. 7, 2021, 4:36 p.m.

When it comes to writing, some writing skills are constrained, meaning once they are learned there is no need to continue to teach or have deliberate practice. Grammar skills are constrained skills. After direct instruction, coaching, and practice, students will have learned these skills and are using them with automaticity as they move through the writing process. Only data will tell if students need to continue to learn or deliberately practice. We can gather this data by looking at student writing and giving students weekly spelling and grammar checks.



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Collecting Ideas and Vocabulary Using Alphaboxes Charts

  • by Kelly Harmon
  • Feb. 7, 2021, 4:27 p.m.

Do your students have trouble determining a topic for writing or deciding what details they want to share related to a topic they are writing about? Years ago, I learned about Alphaboxes from Linda Hoyt. An Alphaboxes chart is quick, brainstorming activity that warms up the brain in a non-threatening, let's-ease-into-this kind of way.


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